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07

Aug

Short Script Finished!

So I realize I’ve been the Tumblr Recluse I never wanted to be with this blog. But i swear good things have come from a couple weeks away from the Tumblr.

I finished a Short Script. Its a comedy of sorts, pretty basic stuff but one of the first things I’ve finished recently. 

Now that its done, I’ve shown it to a couple friends, gotten their feedback and would love if some others would have a read through, with the intention of giving constructive criticism. 

If your interested in reading my 9 page short and offering your ideas and thoughts, it would be very appreciated. Just hit my ask with your name and an email and we’ll go from there!

Thanks friends

01

Aug

slugline:

HEY CREATIVES/SCREENWRITERS/FILMMAKERS! Need a challenge? Call For Entries INFO below! IT’S FREE!
Can you tell your story in just One page?
1. One script per person.
2. Entries must be One page MAX.
3. Entries MUST be about this month’s theme: HAPPINESSBe as CREATIVE as you like with it.
4. Entries must closely follow SLUGLINE’S format. Please see examples at www.slugline.tumblr.com (There are also various sites with formatting tutorials such as: Script Frenzy, Scriptologist, and Simply Scripts)
5. Entries must include title, writer, necessary scene changes and transitions.
6. PDF submissions are preferred but we are open to Word, Final Draft, and Celtx versions as well.
7. Entries will be accepted until August 31st 2012 11:59 PST.
8. E-mail entries to slugline365@gmail.com with your name and tumblr (or other website if you so desire).
9. One winner will be chosen by the first week of September. Prizes include a mini-moleskin notebook(!) and your script featured on SLUGLINE.
10. If you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to ask through tumblr and/or e-mail slugline365@gmail.com
11. SPREAD THE WORD. REBLOG. Like us on Facebook!

slugline:

HEY CREATIVES/SCREENWRITERS/FILMMAKERS! Need a challenge? Call For Entries INFO below! IT’S FREE!

Can you tell your story in just One page?

1. One script per person.

2. Entries must be One page MAX.

3. Entries MUST be about this month’s theme: HAPPINESS
Be as CREATIVE as you like with it.

4. Entries must closely follow SLUGLINE’S format. Please see examples at www.slugline.tumblr.com (There are also various sites with formatting tutorials such as: Script FrenzyScriptologist, and Simply Scripts)

5. Entries must include title, writer, necessary scene changes and transitions.

6. PDF submissions are preferred but we are open to Word, Final Draft, and Celtx versions as well.

7. Entries will be accepted until August 31st 2012 11:59 PST.

8. E-mail entries to slugline365@gmail.com with your name and tumblr (or other website if you so desire).

9. One winner will be chosen by the first week of September. Prizes include a mini-moleskin notebook(!) and your script featured on SLUGLINE.

10. If you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to ask through tumblr and/or e-mail slugline365@gmail.com

11. SPREAD THE WORD. REBLOG. Like us on Facebook!

25

Jul

Like This If You’re Working On Your Script Today!

screenwritersblock:

Stay motivated fellow writers.

Nearly finished a short I’m working on!

23

Jul

And just like that… an idea is born!

You may know what I’m talking about…

Last night I just could not get to sleep. I lay there with my mind racing a mile a minute. This rarely ever happens to me, even less does it happen that I’m thinking about writing. But last night I could not stop.

I’ve never seen the Canadian TV show, Bomb Girls. But i’ve heard of it and last night for about 30 mins I thought of a season long arch for one of the characters. (I don’t know of any of the characters on Bomb Girls. I just assume there are in fact characters on the show, who are most likely girls.)

So I might have to watch the show now.

Then I thought about an idea I had had for a feature script, something I’m hoping to share more with you folks later. The idea slowly grew and formed in my brain. I cursed it for coming so late at night, but like a good idea it stayed with me. 

And then lastly, I’ve been kicking around this idea for a short script that would be pretty cost effective and last night it just slipped into place. All the ideas I had been batting around with it fell into neat little rows. I’m planning on sharing this short as well once its done.

I slept poorly last night, but i’ve been writing like Dicken’s on a Dealine today. 

I’ll take the trade off.

22

Jul

slugline:

Hey CREATIVES! Looking for a challenge? Follow SLUGLINE or like on FACEBOOK to keep updated on its first ever SCREENWRITING CONTEST next month! …prizes will be involved ;)
Help spread the word and REBLOG — unless you don’t think you can handle the competition *shrugs*
More news to come!

slugline:

Hey CREATIVES! Looking for a challenge? Follow SLUGLINE or like on FACEBOOK to keep updated on its first ever SCREENWRITING CONTEST next month! …prizes will be involved ;)

Help spread the word and REBLOG — unless you don’t think you can handle the competition *shrugs*

More news to come!

21

Jul

slugline:

7/21/12 - In Between Jobs

Follow this great Tumblr for a One Page screenplay every day. This is one of my favs!

slugline:

7/21/12 - In Between Jobs

Follow this great Tumblr for a One Page screenplay every day. This is one of my favs!

threelinesorless:

#Screenwriting #Craft
Creating An Unforgettable Screenplay, Part 4: Formatting Basics
by Christine Autrand Mitchell
I’m running into a lot of basic formatting confusion by mostly beginning writers, so I’d like to address the obvious for a change. You’re not allowed to reinvent script formatting. Yes, it’s evolved from silent to sound, and television, single to multiple camera, but there are rules, people! Within them you can reveal your I’ll be talking about a basic, unrepresented spec script.
Whether you use a script writing software or not, there are some basic things you need to know, like:

Print on a single side of the page


Use 2 brads even though you 3-hole punch


Don’t use fancy covers


The magic number of pages fall between 90 and 120 (though it can go over but that’s another article)


Be succinct (see Action below)


EDIT and PROOF your work - spelling and grammar matter! (A great number of scripts get rejected during the first 10 pages of a read because of spelling and grammar errors, as well as formatting mistakes - I kid you not!)


There are two spaces after a period but only one after an ellipsis…


and below there are more important bits.

Font & Margins
Courier 12 - whether it’s Courier, Courier New, Courier + Software Name, doesn’t matter. It is a fixed-pitch font. Margins vary depending upon which “authority” you are referencing. I could write this entire article on margins - but I won’t. Remember that there are right margins as well as left margins. I suggest you use the default of your software or use a reference like Christopher Riley’s “The Hollywood Standard” among others. Font and margins set your maximum number of lines per page at 57.
Title Page
Begin with your title in ALL CAPS about 4” down, 4 lines down put “written by” then skip a line for your name & the other guy’s name. Your contact information, as in address, phone and email, (and optional WGA/Copyright number) go bottom left. If you have representation, that person’s information would appear instead of the writer’s.
First Page
TITLE OF SCRIPT can go top center and then FADE IN: follows left margin, alone on a line.
Scene Heading (or Shot Heading)
It’s the when and where of each scene, always ALL CAPS. Try to stick to Master Shots and away from specific type of shots because you’re the screenwriter, not the director (unless there is a damn good reason).
The order:

INT. (interior) or EXT. (exterior) - where the camera is set up


LOCATION - where is this scene taking place?


(SHOT - i.e. wide, tracking, POV)


(SUBJECT OF SHOT - i.e. car, President)


TIME OF DAY - i.e. Sunrise, Day, Continuous, or specific date

Flashbacks and Dream Sequences can precede INT/EXT but can also be put in as a shot. Denote their end with END FLASHBACK/DREAM as a transition or with a (BACK TO PRESENT) on the next Scene Heading.
Novelists beware: no articles are to be used here!
Action (or Direction)
After Scene Heading, tell us what’s happening. This narrative section allows you to play journalist, providing the what, who, where, when, maybe how, but probably not why. Give us mood and you’ll create lighting and filters,atmosphere and emotion. You don’t need to describe each piece of furniture, but let us get a true feel for the place and for the people being introduced.

Be succinct and give just enough to provide a clear picture. The better you are at waxing poetic here, the more engaged your reader becomes.


Write in present active tense, keep away from adverbs and make your adjectives count - i.e. the paint chipped door CREAKS open


Keep the reader engaged by describing what we see on the screen - never what anyone is feeling or sensing!


The first time a character is introduced, he/she is in ALL CAPS. If he doesn’t ever talk, don’t CAP - unless he is a major character.


In our attention-deficit world, keep action paragraphs to five lines.


Keep CAMERA DIRECTIONS (ALL CAPS) out (or to a minimum), as a rule for selling a spec script. You can allude to things - trust me, it can be done!


SOUND EFFECTS and ON-SCREEN MESSAGES (like texts) are capitalized.

Dialog
Finally, the dialog! The CHARACTER (CAPS) is always first, so we know who’s talking. (If it’s BLOND GIRL and then she gets a name, her NAME is introduced in the Action paragraph and then always use the CHARACTER NAME.) Caution: Name is not in the center of the page - starts at roughly a 4.1” margin.
If the character is a voice over put (V.O.) next to the name, same goes for off-screen (O.S.), meaning the character is in the scene but we don’t see them on camera, like through a door or from another room. If a page break occurs during the dialog, (MORE) should be at the bottom of the page and CHARACTER (CONT’D) on the top of the next page, followed by dialog.
The (parenthetical) is brief and starts at roughly 3.4” margin, has parenthesis around it, doesn’t start with caps, follows the character name and cannot end the dialog, but can be sandwiched between. It is a description about that character’s line delivery or physical action only. Use it sparingly! It’s a short incomplete sentence; separating actions with semicolons. You can use passive verbs and adverbs - yeay! You cannot, however, describe another character’s actions or lines. Here are some examples: (beat), (sotto voce), (in German).
The actual dialog, the lines the characters speak, start at roughly the 2.7” margin. Important: make this sound like a real person is actually talking - read it out loud, record it, have your actor friends read it for you.
If more than one person is speaking simultaneously, you can put them in separate columns (check your margins). Underline emphasis in dialog, no italics, and be economical with it. If someone gets cut off or stops suddenly, denote it with—
The End
Your last words should be FADE OUT as a transition (about 6” margin), but many do like to put THE END centered 4 lines below the previous line.
Make certain you are backing up your files regularly. As you edit, make sure you’re descriptions are succinct and your dialog is well structured.
Happy writing and edit well! Remember, too, this is a visual medium.
——————————
Christine Autrand Mitchell was raised across four countries and splits her time between writing and filmmaking. She writes screenplays, fiction, non-fiction and plays, and is an editor and script analyst. She has credits as a Producer, Director and Casting Director, and heads Entandem Productions. 
Catch up with Christine || twitter || facebook || blogspot || imdb
——————————
Read more TLL articles on the craft of Screenwriting

threelinesorless:

#Screenwriting #Craft

Creating An Unforgettable Screenplay, Part 4: Formatting Basics

by Christine Autrand Mitchell

I’m running into a lot of basic formatting confusion by mostly beginning writers, so I’d like to address the obvious for a change. You’re not allowed to reinvent script formatting. Yes, it’s evolved from silent to sound, and television, single to multiple camera, but there are rules, people! Within them you can reveal your I’ll be talking about a basic, unrepresented spec script.

Whether you use a script writing software or not, there are some basic things you need to know, like:

  • Print on a single side of the page

  • Use 2 brads even though you 3-hole punch

  • Don’t use fancy covers

  • The magic number of pages fall between 90 and 120 (though it can go over but that’s another article)

  • Be succinct (see Action below)

  • EDIT and PROOF your work - spelling and grammar matter! (A great number of scripts get rejected during the first 10 pages of a read because of spelling and grammar errors, as well as formatting mistakes - I kid you not!)

  • There are two spaces after a period but only one after an ellipsis…

  • and below there are more important bits.

Font & Margins

Courier 12 - whether it’s Courier, Courier New, Courier + Software Name, doesn’t matter. It is a fixed-pitch font. Margins vary depending upon which “authority” you are referencing. I could write this entire article on margins - but I won’t. Remember that there are right margins as well as left margins. I suggest you use the default of your software or use a reference like Christopher Riley’s “The Hollywood Standard” among others. Font and margins set your maximum number of lines per page at 57.

Title Page

Begin with your title in ALL CAPS about 4” down, 4 lines down put “written by” then skip a line for your name & the other guy’s name. Your contact information, as in address, phone and email, (and optional WGA/Copyright number) go bottom left. If you have representation, that person’s information would appear instead of the writer’s.

First Page

TITLE OF SCRIPT can go top center and then FADE IN: follows left margin, alone on a line.

Scene Heading (or Shot Heading)

It’s the when and where of each scene, always ALL CAPS. Try to stick to Master Shots and away from specific type of shots because you’re the screenwriter, not the director (unless there is a damn good reason).

The order:

  • INT. (interior) or EXT. (exterior) - where the camera is set up

  • LOCATION - where is this scene taking place?

  • (SHOT - i.e. wide, tracking, POV)

  • (SUBJECT OF SHOT - i.e. car, President)

  • TIME OF DAY - i.e. Sunrise, Day, Continuous, or specific date

Flashbacks and Dream Sequences can precede INT/EXT but can also be put in as a shot. Denote their end with END FLASHBACK/DREAM as a transition or with a (BACK TO PRESENT) on the next Scene Heading.

Novelists beware: no articles are to be used here!

Action (or Direction)

After Scene Heading, tell us what’s happening. This narrative section allows you to play journalist, providing the what, who, where, when, maybe how, but probably not why. Give us mood and you’ll create lighting and filters,atmosphere and emotion. You don’t need to describe each piece of furniture, but let us get a true feel for the place and for the people being introduced.

  • Be succinct and give just enough to provide a clear picture. The better you are at waxing poetic here, the more engaged your reader becomes.

  • Write in present active tense, keep away from adverbs and make your adjectives count - i.e. the paint chipped door CREAKS open

  • Keep the reader engaged by describing what we see on the screen - never what anyone is feeling or sensing!

  • The first time a character is introduced, he/she is in ALL CAPS. If he doesn’t ever talk, don’t CAP - unless he is a major character.

  • In our attention-deficit world, keep action paragraphs to five lines.

  • Keep CAMERA DIRECTIONS (ALL CAPS) out (or to a minimum), as a rule for selling a spec script. You can allude to things - trust me, it can be done!

  • SOUND EFFECTS and ON-SCREEN MESSAGES (like texts) are capitalized.

Dialog

Finally, the dialog! The CHARACTER (CAPS) is always first, so we know who’s talking. (If it’s BLOND GIRL and then she gets a name, her NAME is introduced in the Action paragraph and then always use the CHARACTER NAME.) Caution: Name is not in the center of the page - starts at roughly a 4.1” margin.

If the character is a voice over put (V.O.) next to the name, same goes for off-screen (O.S.), meaning the character is in the scene but we don’t see them on camera, like through a door or from another room. If a page break occurs during the dialog, (MORE) should be at the bottom of the page and CHARACTER (CONT’D) on the top of the next page, followed by dialog.

The (parenthetical) is brief and starts at roughly 3.4” margin, has parenthesis around it, doesn’t start with caps, follows the character name and cannot end the dialog, but can be sandwiched between. It is a description about that character’s line delivery or physical action only. Use it sparingly! It’s a short incomplete sentence; separating actions with semicolons. You can use passive verbs and adverbs - yeay! You cannot, however, describe another character’s actions or lines. Here are some examples: (beat), (sotto voce), (in German).

The actual dialog, the lines the characters speak, start at roughly the 2.7” margin. Important: make this sound like a real person is actually talking - read it out loud, record it, have your actor friends read it for you.

If more than one person is speaking simultaneously, you can put them in separate columns (check your margins). Underline emphasis in dialog, no italics, and be economical with it. If someone gets cut off or stops suddenly, denote it with—

The End

Your last words should be FADE OUT as a transition (about 6” margin), but many do like to put THE END centered 4 lines below the previous line.

Make certain you are backing up your files regularly. As you edit, make sure you’re descriptions are succinct and your dialog is well structured.

Happy writing and edit well! Remember, too, this is a visual medium.

——————————

Christine Autrand Mitchell was raised across four countries and splits her time between writing and filmmaking. She writes screenplays, fiction, non-fiction and plays, and is an editor and script analyst. She has credits as a Producer, Director and Casting Director, and heads Entandem Productions. 

Catch up with Christine || twitter || facebook || blogspot || imdb

——————————

Read more TLL articles on the craft of Screenwriting

Feedback Would Be Appreciated!

screenwritersblock:

The crappy draft synopsis of my script Simplicity:

Simplicity is a love story of not only two people but of seven. They all interact with each other in their own way and love as a family. This family becomes threatened by the rising tension between the youth and the older generation in the city they occupy. Along the way a string of events causes the group of seven to disband, and when the tension in the city reaches its peak, they must reunite to protect their city and each other. 

Send your love to screenwritersblock if you have some ideas on this Synopsis. This idea sunds very cool. My own suggestion is two fold. Get rid of all those extra words. Work this synopsis to be more direct. Secondly, this Synopsis is a little vague in telling us what the script is actually about. If I knew more about the details of the script I could add them, but for now this is my feedback:

Simplicity is a love story between seven members of a family. As tensions rise in their city, dividing the youth from the older generation, each family member must choose which side their on. But as the escalating tension threatens to destroy the city, these seven people must come together to save their city, and themselves.

Hope this helps!!

Screenwriting Tip #1053

screenwritingtips:

Sometimes it pays to deliberately go against the grain. Write a script about a villain. Give a character an unusual combination of traits. Kill off the natural leader character on Page 30. Pick the option nobody else would pick.

I love this tip. Especially killing the natural leader. The Quintessential example of this is Alien. (sorry if you haven’t seen Alien, but also if you have yet to see/read Alien you really should).

19

Jul

Writing References and Prompts: Novel Outlining 101

writersfriend:

I. Novel Outlining

A novel outline is a story plan, written in the abbreviated form of a traditional outline with headings and subheadings. We’re often taught how to outline a novel in school when we learn how to write book reports. To borrow a theme from Jennifer Crusie’s latest novel, the…